UWC

UWC (United World Colleges) is a global
movement that makes education a force to unite
people, nations and cultures
for peace and a sustainable future.     

What is the UWC education? Featuring Pearson
UWC of the Pacific in Victoria, Canada

At age 17, Terence won a scholarship to attend the UWC of the Adriatic in northern Italy, where he spent the next two years studying alongside 200 students from 85 different countries.

What is UWC?

The movement began in 1962 when Atlantic College in Wales, UK admitted its first students. The Cold War raged and UWC set out to bring together young people from different nations to act as champions of peace through an education based on shared learning, collaboration, and understanding.

UWC has since gained global recognition a catalyst for international understanding, and today teaches 3,000 college students each year in 17 locations on 4 continents. Students come from more than 155 countries, each selected for their demonstrated promise and potential. The colleges teach the IB diploma; over 70% of students receive full or partial financial assistance.

In the turbulent world of the 21st century, UWC’s aims and objectives are as relevant today as they were in 1962 – perhaps even more so.

Like ocean rowing, UWC brings students far beyond their comfort zone and into an environment of deep transformation. Living with peers from so many cultures, students see that the world and our human differences are smaller than many believe, and that by working together we can tackle even the greatest challenges.

Students learn that before gender, nationality, religion or any other label, we are all human and share one planet. UWC creates leaders and change-makers the world genuinely needs: teachers, entrepreneurs, scientists, government leaders, farmers, and more. Alumni go into all walks of life, each working to advance our mission to create a more peaceful and sustainable world.

How does UWC foster hope and healing in this post-war region?
Featuring Mostar UWC in Bosnia and Herzegovina